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Rhapsody Health Solutions Team

Beckers Hospital Review lists eight CIO concerns for 2016

 

 

From Becker’s Hospital Review:

“CIOs arguably have some of the hardest jobs in healthcare today. These men and women face interoperability barriers, IT decisions that require significant financial investments and protecting hospital networks and patient records from aggressive hackers and vulnerabilities. Here are eight key events, themes and challenges for CIOs to focus on in the upcoming year.”

 

Good list of concerns here for everyone in health IT to become familiar with. One that stands out to us — other than simply interoperability — is “Managing the data deluge.”

Many of the reasons behind this topic falls under the topic of “data analytics;” however, the respondents replied a lack of organization of the data and the inability to gain actionable insights is a concern.

Since Corepoint Integration Engine sits at the center of a hospital’s data exchange activities, organizations are able to create real-time alerts and notifications using Corepoint Action Points.

If you can’t take real-time action on the data running through your system, what good is it?

See: Deliver data at the bedside using Corepoint Action Points, which tells how LHP Hospital Group alerts nurses on specific floors of specific patient events via pager, instantaneously.

You can also watch this short video:

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